Artist Residency 2017

For the last 2 1/2 months, I have been in residence at the Sitka Center for Art & Ecology on the Oregon coast. During my stay there, where I was given a working studio and a cozy cabin, I focused on my various plankton projects and engaged deeply with the local ocean environment. Regular visits to the nearby Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, connected me with plankton biologists and others who helped me understand more of the wildly fascinating life cycles and relationships in the plankton community right under my nose at the beach. 

My microscope and its camera were excellent tools for total immersion in the plankton universe. John Chapman, a biologist at the Hatfield Marine Science Center, generously invited me to collect plankton late one wintry night off the end of the Newport fishing pier. He brought all the needed equipment and I was able to return to my own "wet lab" at Sitka with a veritable bouillabaisse of zooplankton to observe for the next several days. I was mesmerized and delighted with the quality of the images in every drop of water which I sketched and photographed continually as each organism gradually slowed down and eventually expired, making them much easier to draw!

My work on the prototypes for the plankton board game and action figures continues with more characters carved in alder and painted. Below are a few, poised to make a move on the prototype game board.

Plankton Action Figures - from top LEFT: Dinophysis, (produces diarrhetic shellfish toxin); Sea urchin larva; Pteropod; MIDDLE: Oyster larva; Diatoms, (the oxygen champs); Barnacle larva; BOTTOM:Alexandrium, (produces paralytic shellfish toxin); Ceratium, more oxygen! ; Crab larva

sitkacenter.org

hmsc.oregonstate.edu

Rowboat Gallery Show

Mother and child crab larvae

Mother and child crab larvae

For 2 months my new oceanic sculpture will return to its watery source on the Oregon coast. The work that was fueled and created during my residencies in Boise and Playa will be shown, as well as, other projects currently in process. 

The  Rowboat Gallery in Pacific City is a beautiful light-filled venue just off the beach and across the street from the famous Sportsman's Tavern (excellent fish and chips after the show). 

My work will be displayed alongside Judy Vogland's paintings of layered historical intrigue involving crusty loggers in Oregon's grand ancient forests. Overhill/Undersea considers the human effects on both forests and oceans, giving you something to think about while you walk off the fish and chips on the beach at Bob Straube State Park just down the road from the gallery.

Opening Reception: June 25, 5-7pm. Show continues through August 25.

Rowboat Gallery - 34950 Brooten Road, Pacific City, OR.
http://www.rowboatgallery.com

Plankton Pageantry

A new series of sealife emerged from the studio this week, ghostly white and ready for 3-D scanning and prototyping. Once they are printed as 3" plastic miniatures, they can be refined and made into collectible oceanic super heroes. I'm also working on trading cards with images and a little science to describe each character's attributes and super powers.

End of January will take me to an artist residency in downtown Boise at Surel's Place. I am excited and grateful for the opportunity to experience a new environment and wonderful people, and am looking forward to sharing my work and enthusiasm for ocean life.

After Surel's Place, I'll drive directly to Playa for a month residency there. I am so pleased to be able to return there and have more time in that nourishing creative place.  In both residencies, I will be working on plans for marketing my planktonic sculpture both as large art forms and as educational toys.  

surelsplace.org    playasummerlake.org

From left: oyster larva, crab zoea, sea angel (clione limacina), and 2 dynoflagellates.

From left: oyster larva, crab zoea, sea angel (clione limacina), and 2 dynoflagellates.

Art Invitational - November 7 & 8 at the World Forestry Center 10-4 pm

After working all summer on developing new plankton forms, I've settled on three to show at the Sitka Art Invitational next week. Barnacles have returned to the spotlight, this time in their larval free -swimming form - bristling with antennae and slender jointed legs or setae. A larval form of a marine snail and the planktonic paddle swimmer, Tomopteris are all painted with a pearlescent paint giving them a ghostly and luminous appearance as they do in their ocean habitat.

              Larval form of marine snail drifts freely in the ocean before settling on the bottom.               Alder on charred alder base.

              Larval form of marine snail drifts freely in the ocean before settling on the bottom.

              Alder on charred alder base.

              Tomopteris - paddle swimmer is a fast and voracious feeder of smaller plankton.

              Tomopteris - paddle swimmer is a fast and voracious feeder of smaller plankton.

              Barnacle nauplius - After brooding in the female, thousands of these are released into the ocean.                              After several molts they will settle and cement themselves to the rocks and remain for years.      

              Barnacle nauplius - After brooding in the female, thousands of these are released into the ocean.               

              After several molts they will settle and cement themselves to the rocks and remain for years.

 

 

 

"Tidal Chamber" Washed to New Shores

My recently completed installation, "Tidal Chamber" has fetched up on two new beaches.

I placed one half of the completed assemblage in the entryway of the Discovery Museum - part of the World Forestry Center, near the Portland Zoo. The large kelp, several horseshoe crabs and many, many barnacles round out the piece. Thank-you to the WFC for giving Tidal Chamber a new home in this lovely forest setting. There is no charge to enter the lobby and see my piece, and a $5 charge to see the rest of the exhibits.

The other half of the work has been placed in a beautiful building in Olympia Washington. The Department of Ecology houses many fine works by regional artists in its very modern and light-filled spaces. "Tidal Chamber 11" has found a perfect spot among the cobbles of a long dry riverbed/beach that runs through the middle of the grand building's atrium area. Thank you to Jeffree Stewart for the invitation to show my work with all the other accomplished artists.

Installation at the Discovery Museum near the Portland Zoo. Across the road from the MAX stop.

Installation at the Discovery Museum near the Portland Zoo. Across the road from the MAX stop.

The atrium of the Department of Ecology building in Olympia, Washington.

The atrium of the Department of Ecology building in Olympia, Washington.

My niece, Sophie and Jeffree Stewart who helped me install the work.

My niece, Sophie and Jeffree Stewart who helped me install the work.

Playa - Artist Residency

I spent 2 weeks on the receding shores of Summer Lake at Playa a few weeks ago. 2 hours south of Bend in the pure high desert. After weeks of extraordinary rains, the area was bursting with life. Shorebirds, muskrats, coyotes, snakes and 7 or so other artists, writers and dancers shared this scenic spot in which to indulge our most fervent efforts and ideas. We were given lovely little houses on  a walden like pond with access to studios for our work. Dinners were generously served in a commons house where we could all gather for food and/or society, but most of the time we were each well-immersed in our independent work. It was the very thing I needed to intensify my focus on my carving. Countless thanks to Deb Ford and PLAYA for the generous opportunity.

Perfect working space with roll-up door.

Perfect working space with roll-up door.

Young robin fresh from the nest.

Young robin fresh from the nest.

Horseshoe crab, "giant" plankton, Clio polita on the shore of Summer Lake.

Horseshoe crab, "giant" plankton, Clio polita on the shore of Summer Lake.

Segmented planktonic worm, Tomopteris at play on the Summer Lake beach.

Segmented planktonic worm, Tomopteris at play on the Summer Lake beach.

Dancers at play on PLAYA's pond.

Dancers at play on PLAYA's pond.